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FRANCE FOOTBALL HISTORY

The France national football team (French: Équipe de France de football) represents France in international football. It is fielded by the French Football Federation (French: Fédération Française de Football), the governing body of football in France, and competes as a member of UEFA, which encompasses the countries of Europe. The national team's traditional colours are blue, white and red, the colors of the national flag of France, known as the drapeau tricolore, and the coq gaulois is the symbol of the team. France is colloquially known as Les Bleus (The Blues), which is the name associated with all of the country's sporting national teams, due to the blue shirts each team incorporates.

France played its first official match in 1904, and today primarily plays its home matches at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, a suburb of Paris. The national team has won one FIFA World Cup title, two UEFA European Football Championships, an Olympic tournament, and two FIFA Confederations Cups. Following France's 2001 Confederations Cup victory, they became, along with Argentina, the only national teams to win the three most important men's titles organized by FIFA. France has a strong rivalry with neighbours Italy, and has historically also had important rivalries with Belgium, Brazil, England, Germany, and Spain.

The national team has experienced much of its success during three major "golden generations": in the 1950s, 1980s, and 1990s respectively, which resulted in numerous major honours. France was one of the four European teams that participated in the inaugural World Cup in 1930 and, although having been eliminated in the qualification stage six times, is one of only three teams that have entered every World Cup cycle.[2] In 1958, the team, led by Raymond Kopa and Just Fontaine, finished in third place at the FIFA World Cup. In 1984, France, led by Ballon d'Or winner Michel Platini, won UEFA Euro 1984. Under the leadership of Didier Deschamps and three-time FIFA World Player of the Year Zinedine Zidane, France won the FIFA World Cup in 1998, becoming one of eight national teams to ever do so while hosting the tournament. Two years later, the team triumphed again in UEFA Euro 2000 and became the top team in the FIFA World Rankings for the first time. France has since added a pair of Confederations Cup titles, in 2001 and 2003, as well as an appearance in the final of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, which it lost 5–3 on penalties to Italy.

The France national football team was created in 1904 around the time of FIFA's foundation on 21 May 1904 and contested its first official international match on 1 May 1904 against Belgium, in Brussels, which ended in a 3–3 draw.[3] The following year, on 12 February 1905, France contested their first ever home match against Switzerland. The match was played at the Parc des Princes in front of 500 supporters. France won the match 1–0 with the only goal coming from Gaston Cyprès. Due to disagreements between FIFA and the Union des Sociétés Françaises de Sports Athlétiques (USFSA), the country's sports union, France struggled to establish an identity. On 9 May 1908, the French Interfederal Committee (CFI), a rival organization to the USFSA, ruled that FIFA would now be responsible for the club's appearances in forthcoming Olympics Games and not the USFSA. In 1919, the CFI transformed themselves into the French Football Federation. In 1921, the USFSA finally merged with the French Football Federation.

In July 1930, France appeared in the inaugural FIFA World Cup, held in Uruguay. In their first-ever World Cup match, France defeated Mexico 4–1 at the Estadio Pocitos in Montevideo. Lucien Laurent became notable in the match as he scored not only France's first World Cup goal, but the first goal in World Cup history. France later lost 1–0 to fellow group stage opponents Argentina and Chile resulting in the team bowing out in the group stage. The following year saw the first selection of a black player to the national team. Raoul Diagne, who was of Senegalese descent, earned his first cap on 15 February in a 2–1 defeat to Czechoslovakia. Diagne later played with the team at the 1938 FIFA World Cup, alongside Larbi Benbarek, who was one of the first players of North African origin to play for the national team. At the 1934 FIFA World Cup, France suffered elimination in the opening round, losing 3–2 to Austria. On the team's return to Paris, they were greeted as heroes by a crowd of over 4,000 supporters. France hosted the 1938 FIFA World Cup and reached the quarter-finals losing 3–1 to the defending champions Italy.

The 1950s saw France handed its first Golden Generation composed of players such as Just Fontaine, Raymond Kopa, Jean Vincent, Robert Jonquet, Maryan Wisnieski, Thadée Cisowski, and Armand Penverne. At the 1958 FIFA World Cup, France reached the semi-finals losing to Brazil. In the third place match, France defeated West Germany 6–2 with Fontaine recording four goals, which brought his goal tally in the competition to 13, a World Cup record. The record still stands today. France hosted the inaugural UEFA European Football Championship in 1960 and, for the second straight international tournament, reached the semi-finals. In the round, France faced Yugoslavia and were shocked 5–4 despite being up 4–2 heading into the 75th minute. In the third-place match, France were defeated 2–0 by the Czechoslovakians.

 

FRANCE FOOTBALL TEAM

Fifa  Non-Fifa 
Name  D. o. B.  Position  Current club 
Lloris, Hugo 1986-12-26 Goalkeeper   Tottenham Hotspur 1 0 0 0 0 0
Debuchy, Mathieu 1985-07-28 Right Back   Newcastle United 1 0 0 0 0 0
Evra, Patrice 1981-05-15 Left Back   Manchester United 1 0 0 0 0 0
Mangala, Eliaquim 1991-02-13 Centre Back   FC Porto 1 0 0 0 0 0
Varane, Raphaël 1993-04-25 Centre Back   Real Madrid 1 0 0 0 0 0
Digne, Lucas 1993-07-20 Left Back   Paris Saint-Germain 0 1 0 0 0 0
Sagna, Bacary 1983-02-14 Right Back   Arsenal FC 0 1 0 0 0 0
Matuidi, Blaise 1987-04-09 Centre Midfielder   Paris Saint-Germain 1 0 1 0 0 0
Cabaye, Yohan 1986-01-14 Centre Midfielder   Paris Saint-Germain 1 0 0 0 0 0
Pogba, Paul 1993-03-15 Centre Midfielder   Juventus Torino 1 0 0 0 0 0
Sissoko, Moussa 1989-08-16 Centre Midfielder   Newcastle United 0 1 0 0 0 0
Benzema, Karim 1987-12-19 Centre Forward   Real Madrid 1 0 1 0 0 0
Griezmann, Antoine 1991-03-21 Left Winger   Real Sociedad Donostia 1 0 0 0 0 0
Valbuena, Mathieu 1984-09-28 Right Winger   Olympique Marseille 1 0 0 0 0 0
Giroud, Olivier 1986-09-30 Centre Forward   Arsenal FC 0 1 0 0 0 0
Rémy, Loïc 1987-01-02 Centre Forward   Newcastle United 0 1 0 0 0 0
Ribéry, Franck 1983-04-07 Left Winger   Bayern München 0 1 0 0 0 0

 

WORLDCUP HISTORY

Year Result Position GP W D* L GS GA
 1930 Group Stage 7th 3 1 0 2 4 3
 1934 First Round 9th 1 0 0 1 2 3
 1938 Quarter Final 6th 2 1 0 1 4 4
 1950 Qualified, but withdrew
 1954 Group Stage 11th 2 1 0 1 3 3
 1958 Third Place 3rd 6 4 0 2 23 15
 1962 Did not qualify
 1966 Group Stage 13th 3 0 1 2 2 5
 1970 Did not qualify
 1974
 1978 Group Stage 12th 3 1 0 2 5 5
 1982 Fourth Place 4th 7 3 2 2 16 12
 1986 Third Place 3rd 7 4 2 1 12 6
 1990 Did not qualify
 1994
 1998 Champions 1st 7 6 1 0 15 2
  2002 Group Stage 28th 3 0 1 2 0 3
 2006 Runners-up 2nd 7 4 3 0 9 3
 2010 Group Stage 29th 3 0 1 2 1 4
 2014 Qualified TBD
 2018
 2022
Total 14/20 1 Title 54 25 11 18 96 68


 

FRANCE FOOTBALL PLAYERS RECORD

TOP CAPS

# Name Career Caps Goals
1 Lilian Thuram 1994–2008 142 2
2 Thierry Henry 1997–2010 123 51
3 Marcel Desailly 1993–2004 116 3
4 Zinedine Zidane 1994–2006 108 31
5 Patrick Vieira 1997–2009 107 6
6 Didier Deschamps 1989–2000 103 4
7 Laurent Blanc 1989–2000 97 16
Bixente Lizarazu 1992–2004 97 2
9 Sylvain Wiltord 1999–2006 92 26
10 Fabien Barthez 1994–2006 87 0


 

TOP GOAL SCORERS

# Player Career Goals Caps Average
1 Thierry Henry 1997–2010 51 123 0.42
2 Michel Platini 1976–1987 41 72 0.57
3 David Trezeguet 1998–2008 34 71 0.47
4 Zinedine Zidane 1994–2006 31 108 0.28
5 Just Fontaine 1953–1960 30 21 1.42
Jean-Pierre Papin 1986–1995 30 54 0.55
7 Youri Djorkaeff 1993–2002 28 82 0.34
8 Sylvain Wiltord 1999–2006 26 92 0.28
9 Jean Vincent 1953–1961 22 46 0.47
10 Jean Nicolas 1933–1938 21 25 0.84

 


 

FRANCE FOOTBALL BEST MOMENTS

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