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GERMANY FOOTBALL HISTORY

The Germany national football team (German: Die deutsche Fußballnationalmannschaft) is the football team that has represented Germany in international competition since 1908. It is governed by the German Football Association (Deutscher Fußball-Bund), founded in 1900. Ever since the DFB was reinaugurated in 1949 the team has represented the Federal Republic of Germany – until the German reunification in 1990 commonly referred to as West Germany in informal usage. Under Allied occupation and division, two other separate national teams were also recognized by FIFA: the Saarland team (1950–1956) and the East German team representing the German Democratic Republic (1952–1990). Both have been absorbed along with their records by the current national team. The official name and code "Germany FR (FRG)" was shortened to "Germany (GER)" following the reunification in 1990.

Germany is one of the most successful national teams in international competitions, having won a total of three World Cups (1954, 1974, 1990) and three European Championships (1972, 1980, 1996). They have also been runners-up three times in the European Championships, four times in the World Cup, and have won a further four third places. East Germany won Olympic Gold in 1976. Germany is the only nation to have won both the men's and women's World Cups. The current coaching staff of the national team include head coach Joachim Löw, assistant coach Hans-Dieter Flick, goalkeeper coach Andreas Köpke, athletic coach Shad Forsythe, athletic coach Oliver Bartlett, scout Urs Siegenthaler, and team manager Oliver Bierhoff.

Between 1899 and 1901, prior to the formation of a national team, there were five unofficial international matches between different German and English selection teams, which all ended as large defeats for the German teams. Eight years after the establishment of the German Football Association (DFB), the first official match of the Germany national football team was played on 5 April 1908, against Switzerland in Basel, with the Swiss winning 5–3. Coincidentally, the first match after World War I in 1920, the first match after World War II in 1950 when Germany was still banned from most international competitions, and the first match in 1990 with former East German players were all against Switzerland as well. Germany's first championship title was even won in Switzerland.

At that time the players were selected by the DFB, as there was no dedicated coach. The first manager of the Germany national team was Otto Nerz, a school teacher from Mannheim, who served in the role from 1926 to 1936. The German FA could not afford travel to Uruguay for the first World Cup staged in 1930 during the Great Depression, but finished third in the 1934 World Cup in their first appearance in the competition. After a poor showing at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, Sepp Herberger became coach. In 1937 he put together a squad which was soon nicknamed the Breslau Elf (the Breslau Eleven) in recognition of their 8–0 win over Denmark in the then German city of Breslau, Lower Silesia (now Wrocław, Poland).

After Austria became part of Germany in the Anschluss of March 1938, that country's national team – one of Europe's better sides at the time due to professionalism – was disbanded despite having already qualified for the 1938 World Cup. As required by Nazi politicians, five or six ex-Austrian players, from the clubs Rapid Vienna, Austria Vienna, First Vienna FC, were ordered to join the all-German team on short notice in a staged show of unity orchestrated for political reasons. In the 1938 World Cup that began on 4 June, this "united" German team managed only a 1–1 draw against Switzerland, and then lost the replay 2–4 in front of a hostile crowd in Paris, France. That early exit stands as Germany's worst ever World Cup result (excluding the 1930 and 1950 tournaments in which they did not compete).

During World War II, the team played over 30 international games between September 1939 and November 1942, when national team games were suspended, as most players had to join the armed forces. Many of the national team players were gathered together under coach Herberger as Rote Jäger through the efforts of a sympathetic air force officer trying to protect the footballers from the most dangerous wartime service.

 

GERMANY FOOTBALL TEAM

Fifa  Non-Fifa 
Name  D. o. B.  Position  Current club 
Neuer, Manuel 1986-03-27 Goalkeeper   Bayern München 1 0 0 0 0 0
Boateng, Jérôme 1988-09-03 Centre Back   Bayern München 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jansen, Marcell 1985-11-04 Left Back   Hamburger SV 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lahm, Philipp 1983-11-11 Right Back   Bayern München 1 0 0 0 0 0
Mertesacker, Per 1984-09-29 Centre Back   Arsenal FC 1 0 0 0 0 0
Schmelzer, Marcel 1988-01-22 Left Back   Borussia Dortmund 0 1 0 0 0 0
Ginter, Matthias 1994-01-19 Defender   SC Freiburg 0 1 0 0 0 0
Götze, Mario 1992-06-03 Attacking Midfielder   Bayern München 1 0 1 0 0 0
Kroos, Toni 1990-01-04 Attacking Midfielder   Bayern München 1 0 0 0 0 0
Özil, Mesut 1988-10-15 Attacking Midfielder   Arsenal FC 1 0 0 0 0 0
Schweinsteiger, Bastian 1984-08-01 Centre Midfielder   Bayern München 1 0 0 0 0 0
Großkreutz, Kevin 1988-07-19 Left Winger   Borussia Dortmund 1 0 0 0 0 0
Klose, Miroslav 1978-06-09 Centre Forward   Lazio Roma 1 0 0 0 0 0
Podolski, Lukas 1985-06-04 Left Winger   Arsenal FC 0 1 0 0 0 0
Schürrle, André 1990-11-06 Secondary striker   Chelsea FC 0 1 0 0 0 0

 

WORLDCUP HISTORY

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
 1930 Did Not Enter
 1934 Third Place 3rd 4 3 0 1 11 8 1 1 0 0 9 1
 1938 First Round 10th 2 0 1 1 3 5 3 3 0 0 11 1
 1950 Banned
 1954 Champions 1st 6 5 0 1 25 14 4 3 1 0 12 3
 1958 Fourth Place 4th 6 2 2 2 12 14 Qualified as defending champions
 1962 Quarter-Final 7th 4 2 1 1 4 2 4 4 0 0 11 5
 1966 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 1 15 6 4 3 1 0 14 2
 1970 Third Place 3rd 6 5 0 1 17 10 6 5 1 0 20 3
 1974 Champions 1st 7 6 0 1 13 4 Qualified as hosts
 1978 Second Group Stage 6th 6 1 4 1 10 5 Qualified as defending champions
 1982 Runners-up 2nd 7 3 2 2 12 10 8 8 0 0 33 3
 1986 Runners-up 2nd 7 3 2 2 8 7 8 5 2 1 22 9
 1990 Champions 1st 7 5 2 0 15 5 6 3 3 0 13 3
 1994 Quarter-Final 5th 5 3 1 1 9 7 Qualified as defending champions
 1998 7th 5 3 1 1 8 6 10 6 4 0 23 9
  2002 Runners-up 2nd 7 5 1 1 14 3 10 6 3 1 19 12
 2006 Third Place 3rd 7 5 1 1 14 6 Qualified as hosts
 2010 Third Place 3rd 7 5 0 2 16 5 10 8 2 0 26 5
 2014 Qualified 10 9 1 0 36 10
 2018 To Be Determined
 2022
Total 3 Titles 18/20 99 60 19 20 206 117 84 64 18 2 249 66

 

GERMAN FOOTBALL PLAYERS RECORD

TOP CAPS

# Player Period Caps Goals
1 Lothar Matthäus 1980–2000 150 23
2 Miroslav Klose 2001–present 131 68
3 Lukas Podolski 2004–present 112 46
4 Jürgen Klinsmann 1987–1998 108 47
5 Jürgen Kohler 1986–1998 105 2
Philipp Lahm 2004–present 105 5
7 Franz Beckenbauer 1965–1977 103 14
8 Thomas Häßler 1988–2000 101 11
Bastian Schweinsteiger 2004–present 101 24
10 Michael Ballack 1999–2010 98 42
11 Berti Vogts 1967–1978 96 1
Per Mertesacker 2004–present 96 4
13 Sepp Maier 1966–1979 95 0
Karl-Heinz Rummenigge 1976–1986 95 45
15 Rudi Völler 1982–1994 90 47
16 Andreas Brehme 1984–1994 86 8
Oliver Kahn 1995–2006 86 0
18 Andreas Möller 1988–1999 85 29
19 Arne Friedrich 2002–2011 82 1
20 Karlheinz Förster 1978–1986 81 2
Wolfgang Overath 1963–1974 81 17
Bernd Schneider 1999–2008 81 4

 

 

TOP GOAL SCORERS

# Player Period Goals Caps Average
1 Gerd Müller 1966–1974 68 62 1.13
Miroslav Klose 2001– 68 131 0.53
3 Jürgen Klinsmann 1987–1998 47 108 0.45
Rudi Völler 1982–1994 47 90 0.52
5 Lukas Podolski 2004– 46 112 0.42
6 Karl-Heinz Rummenigge 1976–1986 45 95 0.48
7 Uwe Seeler 1954–1970 43 72 0.60
8 Michael Ballack 1999–2010 42 98 0.43
9 Oliver Bierhoff 1996–2002 37 70 0.53
10 Fritz Walter 1940–1958 33 61 0.54


 

GERMAN FOOTBALL BEST MOMENTS

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